Behind the Scenes

Now that I’ve fixed some URL rewriting settings, I think it’s safe to announce that this blog has now officially moved! I’m no longer at spencerdub.me/blog; instead, this blog now lives at blog.spencerdub.me. Also, I’ve changed the URL permalink writing rules, dropping the year and month from the URLs in favor of simply including the title of the post.

I’m announcing this mostly to keep a record. If I did it right, you shouldn’t have to do nearly anything; I’ve been wrestling with redirect rules in the hopes that most old links to my content will seamlessly lead to the new locations. I have found one strange side effect, though: spencerdub.me/blog/ now redirects to Blogathon Post #1.

Not sure what’s up there, but it’s kinda amusing. I’ll try to fix it later if I can figure it out.

Anyway, update your bookmarks!

Spring 2020 reading list

Since I don’t yet have a cool “Reading” page like gRegor Morrill’s, I figured I’d instead share the books that are currently at the top of my to-read list.

  • What is Communist Anarchism?, by Alexander Berkman. I’m currently reading this one, and am about 80% through. It’s damn good and shockingly relevant, despite being over 90 years old. You can get it for free at The Anarchist Library, by the way.
  • Hiding in Plain Sight: The Invention of Donald Trump and the Erosion of America, by Sarah Kendzior. Sarah Kendzior is a modern-day Cassandra, who has been warning us since before the Trump presidency about the authoritarian threat he presents. This is her latest book, all about… that.
  • The Reactionary Mind, by Corey Robin. I learned about this one from Ian Danskin of Innuendo Studios, whose ongoing video series The Alt-Right Playbook I can’t praise enough. Ian shares his research for the series in a research masterpost and occasionally on Twitter, which is how I learned about this one. I’m very eager to learn more about the history and development of modern conservatism through this book.
  • The Authoritarians, by Bob Altemeyer. Also an Innuendo Studios recommendation, this free book consolidates decades of Bob Altemeyer’s research into the subject. Danskin recommends it as “One of the most useful resources I’ve consumed so far”.

I’m not expecting this to be fun reading, but I think it’s going to help me develop a more thorough understanding of our modern political moment.

A cocktail in a Mason jar, with a slice of lemon on the rim.

At one point during the week that R and I spent in Alaska this past summer, our friend and adventure buddy accidentally spoonerized a certain phrase. We were discussing what to buy for groceries and what sort of drinks we could make, and although she intended to suggest “whiskey gingers,” what came out was “gingy whiskers.”

It was too good a name to pass up, so I filed the name away in my brain, waiting to develop a drink to go with it. I think I’ve figured it out:


Gingy Whiskers

Honey and lemon meet ginger and whiskey in this twist on the classic whiskey ginger.

Gingy Whiskers

Total time:

Serves: 1

Ingredients

  • 2 oz. whiskey
  • 4 oz. ginger ale or ginger beer
  • lemon
  • honey
  • ice

Directions

  1. Pour the whiskey into a glass. Add honey to taste–I usually do a teaspoon or two. Stir to dissolve.
  2. Squeeze half of a lemon over the drink.
  3. Add ice.
  4. Top with ginger ale. Stir.
  5. Garnish with lemon.

Notes

  • One of the difficulties with this drink is dissolving the honey; pouring it over ice is decidedly antithetical to your desires. I’m still trying to figure out the best way to go here.
  • Ginger beer like Reed’s or Cock & Bull would kick this recipe up another notch.
  • This is (obviously) a rough recipe. Adapt it to your tastes.

I would also be remiss if I didn’t tip my hat to Emma’s Whiskey Ginger over on A Beautiful Mess. I hope to make a cocktail that mouth-watering some day.